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The London Design Festival 2014 Highlights

The London Design Festival has closed its doors for another year. If you missed the event (or didn’t manage to see everything), don’t worry, we’ve put together some highlights for you to enjoy.

There were many examples of beautiful and colourful furniture to take inspiration from at this year’s festival. One of our favourites came from furniture designer Jennifer Newman who showed off her bright, brilliant indoor/outdoor tables in Clerkenwell.

The Groove Table by Jennifer Newman

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Carrying on with the outdoor theme, the Victoria & Albert Museum featured a piece by Zaha Hadid Architects called Crest – an ultra-thin, 8 millimetre-thick sculpture made from aluminium, which was stretched over the central pool in the John Madejski Courtyard. Depending on the light and the angle you looked at it, the Crest helped create the illusion of the pool bending and changing shape.

Crest by Zaha Hadid Architects.

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We were also impressed by the company FLOS, who showcased the work of Carl Kleiner and Omar Sosa. The pair focused on their Architectural Lighting collection, and Kleiner was given free rein by FLOS to take pictures the way he liked – which meant abstract compositions, bold colours and geometric formations.

Carl Kleiner’s abstract take on the FLOS Architectural Lighting collection.

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The London Design Festival was a nine-day extravaganza, and with so much on display it would have made even the most ardent design fan’s head spin. Many designers, regardless of their focus, were left speechless when Lee Broom revealed his Nouveau Rebel collection of marble lighting and accessories. Broom’s work was influenced by Greek and Roman ruins and makes heavy use of geometric shapes – particularly circles.

Nouveau Rebel collection by Lee Broom.

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No design festival would be complete without at least some interesting use of colour, and colour was very much a feature in Kirsi Enkovaara‘s exhibition The Landscape of Gravity and Squint‘s Vibrant Velvet series. Enkovaara’s works showed us how gravity affects colour by combining oil paints and water, and then draining the mixture through a vessel. Squint’s work, on the other hand, used brightly coloured velvet material to cover household objects like teapots, statuettes, vases and many other things besides. Squint then combined these objects with heavily designed patchwork furniture.

Kirsi Enkovaara’s The Landscape of Gravity exhibition.

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British interiors brand Squint’s Vibrant Velvet series.

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Anyone looking for pretty prints and patterns to put up on their walls would have been impressed by Kate Farley‘s Hanbury range of geometrically patterned wallpaper, which was inspired by the walls and gardens of Hanbury Hall, Worcester. These designs by Farley are an extension of a previous range by her, the Plot-to-Plate collection. The Hanbury collection, however, is far more geometry-based, and uses sketches and block-printing techniques in order to create variation in scale and motif.

Kate Farley’s Hanbury collection.

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Maria Jeglinska is another designer who had people talking at the London Design Festival this year. With her Drawn Objects series of vessels and trays, Jeglinska has created works that are both traditional and contemporary. It’s no wonder she has been marked out as a rising star in the world of design.

Maria Jeglinska’s Drawn Objects series.

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There were so many events and exhibitions at this year’s London Design Festival it would be impossible to list them all. Everything you can imagine was on display – amazing architecture, inspiring drawings, computer-generated art, you name it, it was there. If you’re feeling like you missed out, there are still plenty of design-focused exhibitions to see at the Victoria & Albert Museum, some of which will be running into late October 2014.

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